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this morning. franklin roosevelt did that because george washington had done it. i mean there's just something wonderful about that. he got out of the car and walked and so did mrs. obama. why? because jimmy carter did it in 1977. every president since has done it. i mean, >> a great strength to him. he might be more liberal than most people politically. in his personal demeanor, in his family life and in his style he's a very traditional person. that came across. that helps people relate to him. >> ifill: mark said he talked to a democrat who said he thought he did pretty well. did you talk to any republicans? >> i think they thought it was a good speech. people said this was one of his best speeches. some of them thought it was defensive, about defending the welfare state more than being offensive. i think the sentence that really got some republicans more upset was where he said we don't have to choose between protecting the programs for the elderly and securing programs for the young. i would say most republicans say, well, actually we do have a choose. if you keep the current benefit leve
they couldn't actually be here. >> they would have heard something different before franklin roosevelt. franklin roosevelt was the first president to initiate the repetition of each line of the oath after the chief justice gives it. before that, they went through the entire oath and the president would say i do. >> very interesting. i did not know that. >> we also saw that president obama will put his hand on the lincoln bible, also a bible used by dr. king. what's the history of that? >> well, all but three presidents have put their hands. the three are john quincy adams who put his hand on a book of laws. and calvin coolage and franklin. it was accustom not to put your hand on a bible. so only three. >> what i didn't know and i don't think i knew nor did i see happening where the hand is. that is all very thought out too. >> right. everything is a message during the inauguration. beyond the speech. for example, the first inaugural parade to have african american was abraham lincoln in 1865. the first to have women marching was woodrow wilson. the people are thinking through the symbo
's a ritual. there's a lot of celebrities in the crowd. i learned he join us franklin roosevelt as the only president to take the oath four times. he did it over two terms though. >> do you want to explain that? >> well he did it twice the first time because of roberts and then he did it twice this time because of sunday. >> yesterday, roberts read from a piece of paper when he administered the formal oath. >> it's experience. you learn from experience. today it will be how obama tackles the speech. in the past it has been a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to br
tradition of the inauguration speech held at the capitol. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision. the president of the united states can decide above and beyond the date and the time everything else is tradition and can be changed. we reverted back to holding inaugurations at the capitol. we moved them from the east front to the west front and the crowd has been getting bigger and bigger. one reason on the west front is that you can accommodate more people. if you look at the photographs of the last several inaugurations, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was sworn in, the crowds went back to a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, at the crowd gets a little bit further
, ask what you can do for your country. franklin roosevelt, let me assert my firm believe that the only thing we have to fear is fear it itself. >> what makes a speech a part of history and what does this president need to say tomorrow as he begins his second term joining us are michael gerson speechwriter for president bush and james fallis, speechwriter to president carter. you say you don't write to be etched in granite, but i know that writers know when words ring. when you put words on paper, you think, i can see this, you know, as being what will be taken from this speech. so how do you craft those? >> it's true. the chair richter version is the state of the union address. i think with the inaugural address it's harder because something that registers as a showy line may come off as too showy. i think my sense of inaugural addresses the more they are poem like, the more they are spared, the less they try do the usually better they stand up. >> do you agree, less is more is this. >> yeah. and shorter is better. that helps. when richard nixon was wrikts his second inaugural, he look
of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that's the message on this martin luther king day. and he said when times change, so must we. so i think all of those things are right. and he said, you know, it's not what binds this nation together is not the color
. franklin roosevelt had to long-term affairs. from the missy the hand, marguerite is a personal aide in secretary and coat and dress their and undress her. they, too. but if we found out about fdr's misbehavior one of which are fdr out of office and demanded his visit nation economy was recovering? on way back to the french and indian war. the young george washington was writing romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. name is sally fairfax, an attractive, older sophisticated neighbor. what if washington's letters have become public during the french and indian war for the revolutionary war, much as petraeus is enough to team public and what we got rid george washington? bill clinton is not the first and the worst. and there, done that, a long history of it. it pains me to say even abraham lincoln visited a. say it isn't so, but it happened. the details on matters itchy. there's not a lot of letters written about this, but lincoln's best friend was joshua speed and speed was perhaps as dashing and from unlucky with the ladies as lincoln was homely and awkward unlucky
wants. franklin roosevelt in 1937 got in the biggest landslide in presidential history. the congress was more democratic than it had been in that century, has ever been since then, yet he saw the supreme court overruling program after program of his so he decided to come back and ask congress to be able to pack the courts with justices of his own choosing. they slapped it down, had a lot to do with that being a miserable term nap's what barack obama was talking about when he said overreach. >> james, i'm curious about potential powder kegs here. without thinking about things like natural disasters that could come along, what are things that you see as potentially plaguing this second term? does the arab spring and some negative fallout from that terrorism, anything else just -- >> bypass the natural disaster piece so quickly because i think that climb change is something that is not as random as we think it is. so this administration, because i think it owes it to the folk who put them in place, has to be knowledgeable about how our environment is going to unfold in the next several
that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean the future. >> one example of this in history is that lincoln at the beginning of his presidency idolized george washington, thought a lot about him, but as the problems got more difficult, as he became in certain ways more radical he was much more interested in people like thomas jefferson. there is that evolution. >> so is there a concern that this president expressed when you had that intimate dinner about looking at history and where other presidents went wrong? >> i think most presidents know that in this off the record dinner. we won't go into a sort of a transcript, but i think you can see very much in terms of what he says in public and what he does that this is someone who, for instance, if you talk about lyndon johnson and the war in vietnam he not only know what is people are talking about but t
has been a popular destination for past presidents beginning in 1933 with president franklin d roosevelt. since roosevelt, every president has attended church with many opting to attend st. john's. john's. after church, the first family will return to the white house. president and mrs. obama will host a tea for members. the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies. once that ends, the first family will leave the white house for the drive up to the capt. the president and first family should be announced and seated on the platform a little after 11:00 with the public oath then being taken at 11:55 followed by the inaugural address. -- for the drive up to the capitol. >> after all the morning pomp and circumstance, the president, vice president and their riffs will attend the inaugural luncheon at the u.s. capitol's national statuary hall. steamed lobster with new england clam chowder sauce. hudson valley apple pie. members of congress, supreme court justices, cabinet members and other invited officials will also attend the lunch. >> another big story, the super bow
to make our government a place for what franklin roosevelt called bold, persistent experimentation, a government for our tomorrows, not our yesterdays. let us give this capital back to the people to whom it belongs. [applause] to renew america, we must meet challenges abroad as well as at home. there is no longer a clear division between what is foreign and what is domestic. the world economy, the world environment, the world aids crisis, the world arms race -- they affect us all. today, as an older order passes, the new world is more free but less stable. communism's collapse has called forth old animosities and new dangers. clearly, america must continue to lead the world we did so much to make. while america rebuilds at home, we will not shrink from the challenges nor fail to seize the opportunities of this new world. together with our friends and allies, we will work to shape change, lest it engulf us. when our vital interests are challenged or the will and conscience of the international community is defied, we will act, with peaceful diplomacy whenever possible, with force wh
. >> this is from this morning's "washington post." you can draw an analogy to two former president, franklin roosevelt and dwight eisenhower, finding parallels to what fdr delivered in his second address in 1937, and what eisenhower faced in 1957. >> the roosevelt second inaugural address is interesting to read because it really is of a peace with first inaugural. the president said, i came in with a huge crisis, i have been leading this country through, we're on the right path. we are going to keep going. he has a phrase in there -- have we found our happy valley? it was a very fine speech. i would have to go back and look at it again. i do not read it as being an aggressive speak. he was speaking to the whole country, but he was not in campaign mode. roosevelt was very good in that way. of course, eisenhower never sounded like that. >> that speech is recognized as one of the better second inaugurals. i think it does echoes some of the themes of obama, president obama. one of back and look the lines in that speech is, i see a nation ill-clothed -- one-third of the nation. he talked about in
. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i h
clinton fatigue and bush fatigue and reagan fatigue. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. [video clip] >> i have one major regret. i took a risk with our action in regards to ira
. >> reporter: franklin delano roosevelt lifted people's spirits too. he used the first of his four inaugural addresses to start the healing of a nation badly broken from the great depression. >> the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> reporter: more than a generation later when nearly 2 million people crowded onto the national mall to see the swearing in of the first african-american president, it was a moment of national unity. but as this historian notes when the president gives his second inaugural address, the magic for the most part is lost. >> they are not as impressive not as compelling as first inaugural spices. >> don baer who was a speech righter for clinton says the most recent speeches whether by eisenhower, fdr, reagan clinton, or george w. bush don't soar to the same heights as they're measured against the reality of the first four years. >> well the first inaugural is sort of like a new baby right? there's so much expectation and potential. the second is like an adolescent, a teenager. we know it didn't quite turn out exactly the way we hoped.
for the fourth time since franklin roosevelt. >> jennifer: amazing. >> john: very true. that's a piece of trivia that won't be matched any time soon. >> jennifer: while we're watching the inaugustral procession, the first president to actually ride in a bulletproof car was lyndon johnson in 1965, michael shure. the first president to ride in a car at all, excuse me, david shuster, are you there? the first president to ride in a ceremony in a car was warren harding back in 1921. so shuster, can you see from where you are. you've got a unique spot looking back at the capitol. can you see any of that happening? >> yeah, we can see over to constitution avenue. can see the crowds blocked off. we can see the monitor. what i wanted to say about the motorcade is a couple of things. first of all, in order to prepare pennsylvania avenue for this path, they removed something like 25 different stoplights that were on poles and the other thing that they do as part of security is early this morning, the electric company and gas company will go manhole cover by manhole cover, prop them open, make sure nothing
little facts about our inaugural weather. wettest inaugural, franklin d. roosevelt. 1.77 inches of rain picked up during the inaugural swearing-in. almost .7. then the snowiest inaugural, william taft, 9.8 inches of heavy snow, drifting snow, strong winds. almost blizzard-like conditions. clouding up later. 30% chance of afternoon snowshowers. temperatures in the mid 30s to the low 40s. by the afternoon, we're looking for a high of 47 degrees. that's what's going on around the country. here's what's happening in your neck of the woods. >> good morning. right on the mall, temperatures are a little above freezing now. generally in the mid 30s. elsewhere, still below freezing in many locations in the rural areas. it's in the upper 20s to near 30. we have clouds coming through. a mostly cloudy day with highs reaching the mid and upper 40s in washington. elsewhere, highs in the upper 30s and low 40s. windy and cold tonight. maybe some passing snowshowers late afternoon into the evening that could leave a dusting. windy and cold weather tomorrow >> and that's your latest weather. savannah? >>
with president franklin delano roosevelt. many have opted to attend st. john's. >> after church, the first family will return to the white house. president and mrs. obama will then host a tea for members of the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies. once that ends, the first family will leave the white house for the drive up to the capitol. the president and first family should be announced and seated on the platform a little bit after 11:00 this morning with the public oath then taken at 11:55 followed by the inaugural address. the president's aides say the speech will be forward looking and it will emphasize the nation's founding values. >> after all the morning pomp and circumstance, the president, vice president and their wives will attend the inaugural luncheon. here is a peek at the menu. they will be having steamed lobster with new england clam chowder sauce, hickory grilled bison with red potato horseradish cake. >> never even heard of that. >> and hudson valley apple pie. i heard of that one before. members of congress, supreme court justices, cabinet members and other in
: only two presidents have been sworn in on two separate occasions, franklin d. roosevelt and barack obama because of what happened in 2009. swearing in at noon eastern time today for the president, tomorrow is the public ceremony. vice-president joe biden will be sworn in within the next 10 minutes to 15 minutes from his residence. the flag in the center of your screen is the same one used in his ceremonial office. you can see two paintings. one is lincoln delivering his second inaugural address. one of the more memorable second inaugural addresses in history. guest: that is exactly right. the end of the civil war, leaving it the country at a press of this for which direction they could go. in his words, now the story is none, it set the groundwork for what he envisioned. historians have argued about how it was carried out and what may have been one of the world's greatest what ifs, if he had not been assassinated a few days later. let just a couple of miles to the white house, where the vice president and his official residence is located. the first vice-president of the president
to franklin roosevelt's overreaching and historic change of the politics of the country? >> you see the congressional leaders for the country. steny hoyer, and we just saw them go to the capitol. >> we saw janet napolitano, and security making their way in. you were talking about lincoln in the course of this presidency. i want to pick up the pictures of him because they are among the most startling. he lost 50 pounds. he was about 150 pounds weighing in, at 6'4". >> the picture on the right side, abraham lincoln, only 56 years old. look at those eyes. of course, the lincoln memorial there. martin luther king in the shadow, gave that speech 50 years ago. and there, we see, as you see more -- i think that's katy perry there. >> i believe it is. >> on the steps of the capitol. along with john mayer. we're going to come back. she performed at the kids' concert saturday night. we're going to hear from beyonce, and kelly clarkson, and james taylor, at this ceremony. they're having fun. probably tweeting that out. >> tweeting immediately. >> we'll be right back with much more of our inaug
as well as the financial meltdown, bill clinton was impeached, and the list can go on. even franklin roosevelt who seemed to be able to do no wrong in his first term badly stumbled in his second term. history says that president obama has like 16 to 18 months and he will really need the other side. can he turn the nation around? i don't think he can in the way he did in the speech and i think he will find that very quickly he will need the republicans, who were sort of left out, who got sort of hidden bystanders of this speech today. >> i want to ask you that. you reference the idea of jefferson complaining about the press and ulysses grant complaining about the reporters as well. the partisan tone of this speech, i mean, there weren't a lot of a attacks, but in a sense it was pretty partisan and wasn't a lot for the other side. is that unusual in an inaugural address? >> i think it is a little bit unusual and i think charles put it it adequately when he said that this is kind of a clarion call that barack obama is sending out and what we are probably seeing is the the most unvarnish
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
about our inaugural weather. wettest inaugural, franklin d. roosevelt, 1.77" of rain they picked up during the inaugural swearing in, almost .7" of rain. and snowiest inaugural, william taft, 9.8" of snow, heavy snow, drifting snow in 1909. cloud i clouding up later today. chance of afternoon snow showers. temperatures in the mid 30s to low 40s. by the afternoon we're looking for a high of about 47 degrees. >> good morning.ing on aroundt' a strong cold front will not the temperatures into the 20's tomorrow. today, a chance for some snow showers la >> and that's your latest weather. savannah? >> al, thanks. >>> our live coverage of this inauguration day continues here on nbc. yes, we are waiting for word on what michelle obama is wearing this day. but first this is "today" on nbc. >>> welcome back to washington, d.c. that's the first look we've gotten this morning of the president, first lady and first daughters as they got ready to attend church. they are inside st. john's church as we speak on this inauguration day. and we should just mention we now have the information some people
with the first one you have noted for us, involves franklin delano roosevelt. >> let's listen. >> my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into-- >> and that's interesting, because there was 1933 at the depression was on everybody's mind and everybody was afraid, so, what does he talk about? fear. >> it's a great speech in the sense he didn't get into policy prescriptions, he wasn't going to say i'm going to do this or i'm going to do that. or i have a 20-point plan. he spent the whole speech talking about the fact we need to get a steely resolve and see it through and talked about fear and said that's the only thing to fear, it's not about the future, we're going to be fine. one of the classics. >> steve: meanwhile, let's take a look at john f. kennedy's inaugural back in the '60s. >> our country and all who serve it, and the globe from that-- and truly like the world and so, my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. and
by franklin delanor roosevelt and a harbinger of his strength to come. that was the greatest inaugural of the 20th century. it brought back the american spirit at a dismal time, a time of deep economic depression and for many lost hopes. we have nothing to fear but fear itself remains a tier of american confidence. and later in that test of american strength, the second world war, people believed we would win out simply because fdr was president. for my generation it was john f. kennedy's zesty charge to the american people that became the statement of the best and brighter years of the 1960s. >> my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. >> ronald reagan gave the first inaugural address from the west front of the capitol. in doing so issued a manifesto of the area's conservative tide. >> in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem. >> but the most recent inaugural address was that given by barack obama. >> this is the price and the promise of citizen ship. this is the source
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)